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What constitutes special leave for dependants?

The Trust’s special and compassionate leave procedure states that up to three days paid special leave may be granted over a twelve month rolling period to deal with emergencies.

Paid special leave examples

It is not possible to list every type of situation that may occur, however some examples of when paid special leave could be granted are as follows:

  • Illness of a dependant and the need to make care arrangements
  • Breakdown of existing care arrangements for a dependant
  • Addressing an unexpected incident involving a child during school hours

Unpaid special leave examples

It is not possible to list every type of situation that may occur, however the following are examples of when paid special leave may not be applicable:

  • Minor illness (cough, cold etc.) of main carer for a dependant where they are not incapacitated or hospitalised
  • Temporary/short term interruption or delay to existing care arrangements for a dependant (e.g. due to traffic delays)
  • Planned attendance at school to discuss an incident involving a child

The Trust accepts that in circumstances such as the above, staff may need a short period of unplanned time off work to deal with the situation which has occurred and a request to take annual or unpaid leave or time off in lieu at short notice will be considered sympathetically.

The length of time granted off, should only be for the purposes of making alternative arrangements, therefore half working days or a few hours can also be considered.

Considerations

Questions to consider if dependant’s special leave is requested:

  • How much time will I realistically need to make alternative arrangements and normal arrangements can resume?
  • Is there a friend or family member who could help out whilst I am at work?
  • Can any arrangements be made by telephone during breaks?
  • Can I change my working hours/pattern in order to deal with the issue without disruption to my ward, team or department?
  • Can the school issue be discussed by telephone?
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