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Date: 23 September 2020

Time: 21:26

Phosphoris-32 treatment

What is P-32?

The active ingredient in P-32 is a radioactive form of Phosphorus. It also contains non-radioactive sodium chloride for injections.

Who makes P-32?

P-32 is manufactured by the National Centre for Nuclear Research Radioisotope Centre Polatom in Poland.

It is marketed in the U.K. by:

Diagnostic Imaging Ltd.
Elkington Lodge
Welford
Northants
NN6 6HE

When is P-32 used?

P-32 is used to treat conditions where the bone marrow produces too many blood cells. Some of the radioactive P-32 that is injected will be taken up by the dividing cells in your bone marrow that produce new blood cells. It will then deliver radiation directly to these cells, reducing the production of blood cells.

What precautions have to be taken when using P-32?

The use of P-32 does involve administration of radioactivity. Because there are strict laws covering the use, handling and disposal of radioactivity, P-32 will always be administered in a hospital. The injection will be carried out by staff who are trained and qualified in the safe handling of radioactive medicines.

The effects of P-32 within the body are limited to the areas where it concentrates. It cannot cause any harm to any other people by spending time near you. However, for the first few weeks after injection some P-32 will be present in your blood and urine. Because of this, you should take the following precautions for the first two weeks after treatment:

  • whenever possible, use a normal toilet instead of a urinal. Gentlemen should sit to urinate rather than stand. The toilet should be flushed twice after each use
  • wipe up any spilled urine with a tissue and flush it away
  • ensure that you always wash your hands after using the toilet
  • immediately wash any bedding or clothes which become stained with urine. Wash them separately from other clothes, and rinse thoroughly
  • if you should cut yourself wash away any spilled blood
  • if you use incontinence pads, these should be placed in plastic bags and disposed via the household dustbin
  • if you use any urine collection device please ring Nuclear Medicine for advice before your treatment date
  • if you have dressings or bandages changed by a visiting nurse they can still do this. They should use the same precautions as for infection control e.g. disposable gloves and plastic apron. Used items and dressings should be placed in a plastic bag and disposed via the household dustbin

How long does P-32 last in the body?

The radioactivity declines with time and will have disappeared after a few months. You will be asked to carry a contact card for about a month after your treatment.  You should carry this with you at all times and show it to any medical staff that you have contact with so they know that you have been treated with P-32.

Will P-32 affect the activities I can undertake?

The radioactivity declines with time and will have disappeared after a few months. You will be asked to carry a contact card for about a month after your treatment.  You should carry this with you at all times and show it to any medical staff that you have contact with so they know that you have been treated with P-32.

How is P-32 administered?

P-32 is administered as a single injection into a vein in the arm or hand. This is similar to having a blood test.

Will P-32 have any adverse effects?

There should be no noticeable effects following the injection and you will be able to leave the department immediately afterwards.

The number of cells in your blood is expected to fall but rarely causes medical problems. Your doctor may therefore wish to carry out routine blood tests after your treatment to check your blood counts. If you have any concerns, consult your doctor.

Who do I contact for more information?

If you have any questions about your treatment please contact the Nuclear Medicine Department.

Tel: 0121 371 2282

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